Day 42 – Why do we cry?

Because I was learning about tears and crying I drew this girl.

Because I was learning about tears and crying I drew this girl.

Gracie 

Has anyone ever wondered why people cry when they are sad? Well, I always wonder about things. People say that I’m a dawdler, but that’s because they don’t realise that whilst I plod along behind, I’m wondering, observing and dreaming. That is my key to success.  People want to know how to be inspired in poetry, wonder, wander, observe and dream.

Anyhow, about tears and why we cry, I decided to do some research. There are three types of tears: Reflex tears, basal tears and physic tears.

Reflex tears are what you cry when you get an irritant substance in your eyes. For example, onion acid. These tears try to wash it out.

You cry basal tears constantly. They wash over your eyes, protecting them and stopping them from drying out. There is salt in our watery tears that kills any harmful bacteria.

Physic tears are what I really wanted to learn about. You cry these when you feel a very strong emotion such as sadness.

There are different theories about how this works and what the point of theses tears are, but nothing is scientifically proven. Some people think that the tear gland, located just below your eyebrow, is connected to a section in your brain that feels emotions.

Others think that tears are a signal of distress that we send out to get sympathy and help from other humans. Animals don’t have physic tears though, so why do we? People think it is because we want to send the signal without letting out a scream that would allow our ( animal) predators to see that we are afraid and weakening.

 

I don ‘t know what I believe!

I decided to do a drawing project on tears and crying.

This girl is depressed

This girl is depressed

This one is walking through a wild storm, her hair is whipped around and the wind is stinging her eyes> She's crying reflex tears.

This one is walking through a wild storm, her hair is whipped around and the wind is stinging her eyes. She’s crying reflex tears.

There's a story behind this one, but I don't want to be the one to tell it. Please leave a comment with a short snippet of story about this young girl. What has upset her? Why is she sad?

There’s a story behind this one, but I don’t want to be the one to tell it. Please leave a comment with a short snippet of story about this young girl. What has upset her? Why is she sad?

Day 41 – Foraging

We found two Shaggy Parasols in the shade of a tree on the edge of a wooded path

We found two Shaggy Parasols in the shade of a tree on the edge of a wooded path

EVAN

We found some shaggy parasols, a type of edible mushroom, when we went out for a walk today.

When we got back to the boat dad asked me to identify them, at first we thought they were parasol mushrooms.

HOW TO IDENTIFY A PARASOL MUSHROOM:

They are commonly found on the edges of grassy clearings and in woodlands from July to November.

The stem is a whitey/creamy colour with brown scales.

There is a large double ring around the stem which eventually slides down to the base.

The cap has browny grey scales, it has a small central bump known as an umbo.

The gills are white and do not change colour when cut.

The cap can be between 10 and 25cm in diameter.

BUT, the next day we found out that they were actually Shaggy Parasols.

HOW TO IDENTIFY SHAGGY PARASOLS:

They are commonly found in or beside woods or hedges.

They are smaller than parasol mushrooms, the caps are between 5 and 15cm in diameter.

When cut, the stem turns red.

It does not have scales on the stem.

It has a moveable double ring the same colour as the stem.

They have white gills.

FACT

Shaggy Parasols can be poisonous to some people.

We only found two and we didn’t eat them.

Shaggy Parasol

Shaggy Parasol

Taken the following day, it's gone a bit brown

Taken the following day, it’s gone a bit brown